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Tell your dog i said hi


Tell your dog i said hi.

Tell your cat i said hi.

Tell your friend i said hi.

And tell your friends...

How does he react to i said hi?

A:

The first two clauses are correct, but the last one is wrong. You can phrase it as:

How does he react to the phrase 'Hi'?"

I don't really like the last version, though, since the first two clauses are already good. As written, it's also a bit passive, since you're asking a question about the reaction, not necessarily stating that you heard him say it.

Here are a few other phrasing options:

How does he react to hearing the phrase 'Hi'?"

How does he react to hearing the phrase 'Hi'?"

Or:

What does he say when he hears the phrase 'Hi'?"

A:

I am not a native English speaker. But I feel that the first two phrases are correct and the last one is wrong. When using the phrases in the question, the subject is a pronoun. It's not plural.

"Your dog, your cat, your friend" is correct.

"Your dogs, your cats, your friends" is also correct.

A:

You can use either of these forms:

How does he react to hearing the phrase 'Hi'?"

or

How does he react to hearing the phrase 'Hi'?"

A more standard form would be:

How does he react to hearing the phrase 'Hi'?"

But I agree with the other commentators that it's better to say:

How does he react to hearing the phrase 'Hi'?"

or

What does he say when he hears the phrase 'Hi'?"

I would say the third phrase is definitely wrong.

The other two forms, though, are fine.

A:

As suggested by the other answers, the phrase that is wrong, according to your question, is 'your dogs'. In English, a possessive is formed using a contraction, and 'your' has no contraction, so we have to add the apostrophe. So 'your dogs' is 'your dog's, which is incorrect.

So if you are looking for the most common mistake, the correct phrase is either

How does he react to hearing the phrase 'Hi'?"

or

What does he say when he hears the phrase 'Hi'?"

The second one is slightly more common, in fact it is the only way to be grammatically correct.

A:

The correct form of this sentence should be:

How does he react to hearing the phrase 'Hi'?"

A possessive form is not correct here.

What does he say when he hears the phrase 'Hi'?"

A possessive form is not correct here.

'Your dogs' means 'to your dogs'. Your dog's is an apostrophe-s plus a contraction of 'to your' and 'dogs'. It does not mean 'to your dogs'.

'His' means 'his'.

In this sentence

What does he say when he hears the phrase 'Hi'?"

there is a possessive word, 'he', which can be written as 'he's', 'his', 'his-s', or 'his-z'

the apostrophe-s is a possessive 's' and not an apostrophe-z which means 'his-z'.

The problem that you have is that you are looking at the wrong form, the possessive. You are seeing the possessive form, which is not correct, but the error in your question (and the reason that the correct sentence is 'How does he react to hearing the phrase "Hi"' not 'How does he react to hearing the phrase Hi") is that the phrase you are talking about is not correct and is missing a 'z' before 'his'. 'Hi' is not a possessive form, because it is not a word.

Possessive:

Possessive nouns have an apostrophe-s before the noun. A possessive noun is a noun that ends in a s.

Sandra's, my, this, your, her, their

Possessive adjective:

A possessive adjective is a word that describes what belongs to a noun, like your, their, their, his. It can't be a noun in itself, so it's always preceded by the apostrophe-s. It has the apostrophe-s before it, like in 'my', 'his', 'hers', etc.


Watch the video: tell your dog i said hi (January 2022).

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